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November 24, 2018
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A team of Egyptian archaeologists discovered a 3000-year-old Ramesside tomb in Assasif area on the west bank of the Nile in Luxor, Egypt.

The work started in March 2018 and stopped in May 2018 then resumed in August 2018 and still ongoing.

During the work, over 300 cubic meters of debris was cleared. The tomb shows depictions of Queen “Ahmos-Nefertari” and her son “Amenhotep I” according to minister of antiquities, Dr. Khalid El-Enany.

The tomb belongs to a man called “Shu En Khet.ef” meaning “North Wind in his back” who was a “Scribe of the mummification chapel in Mut temple” as Dr. Mostafa Waziri, Secretary-General of the Supreme Council of Antiquities said during the press conferece held this morning a couple of hundred meteres away from the famous temple of Deir Bahari in the background and a few steps of the said discovered tomb.

Dr. Waziri added that the Scribe’s wife was a “Chantress of Mut”.
In their tomb, over 1000 ushabtis, coloured wooden masks, faience figurines and papyri bears a part of chapters 125 of Book of the Dead were found.

Then during the work and in September 2018, a side room was discovered and it was sealed with mud bricks.
Inside that room, 2 wooden coffins were found with flowers on top of them and in perfect condition of preservation. The coffins are dated to 25th or 26th Dynasty.
First one for a man called “Padiese” who was a high priest of Amun and the other coffin for his wife who was a chantress of Amun.

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